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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 1:01 am 
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Yesterday we were hiking Madera Canyon. I found this in a "controlled burn" area.

Attachment:
naked cactus Madera Canyon.jpg
naked cactus Madera Canyon.jpg [ 393.18 KiB | Viewed 95 times ]
Attachment:
naked cactus Madera Canyon-2.jpg
naked cactus Madera Canyon-2.jpg [ 315.39 KiB | Viewed 93 times ]


Good luck,
AZED

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 1:45 am 
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I think I'll have to go with Mammillaria grahmii.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 9:49 am 
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yeah... Me too! If I had to imagine mine with no... spines, I'd guess it'd look like that.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 11:31 pm 
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Well it could be Mammillaria grahamii. We were a bit higher than 5000 ft and I have surveyed this particular area several times in the past. I have never run across a M. grahamii in this particular Oak Woodland area. I have seen Mammillaria mainiae, Echinocereus rigidissimus (many) and Ferocactus wislizeni. About 10 miles north I have found a few of what I call Mammillaria grahamii var oliviae, an M. grahamii without the hooked central but only on steep south facing road cuts. None that I saw approached the 4" length of the nuded plant.
M. mainiae can do that and that is what I think it could be.
This link is to a few more of the images we took. The damage to the C&S was extensive. On the other hand if the burn was not done now nature would ignite the grasses after they have increased the fire load and that would take out everything including the forest.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/arizonaed/ ... 5477515193

Enjoy,
Snow on the cactus this morning,
AZED

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 11:36 pm 
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paulzie32 wrote:
yeah... Me too! If I had to imagine mine with no... spines, I'd guess it'd look like that.

I always imagine mine without. It makes me less nervous when I talk to them :wink:

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 11:59 pm 
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Yeah, fire is good when it happens often. It's a normal thing where I live (as you see in the news every fall), left to nature everything burns off every 10 to 20 years, but with human intervention it's more like 60+ years. That makes it so plants that need fire to germinate have a very hard time holding out until the next fire, and when it does come often it's too hot and it sterilizes the soil and kills the resistant plants.

Looks like half those cacti will live, some look like goners too though. Sad to see the feros. Maybe next time your cactus rescue crew could stack sandbags or other protection around the cacti.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 4:06 pm 
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Looks weird, almost deformed. And not just because all the sticky out bits are gone :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 5:37 pm 
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Actually my first thought (before reading the text) was that it was some new Mam like M. leutheyii-columnaris.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 1:02 am 
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As I look at the area with the greatest amount of spines left, the top, it appears to have many areoles with the stubs of 2 or 3 centrals. That would eliminate M. grahamii.
The growth is unusual above the more symetrical base growth.
A blo*up of the top.

Attachment:
Madera Canyon Controled Burn-20.1.jpg
Madera Canyon Controled Burn-20.1.jpg [ 199.29 KiB | Viewed 95 times ]


Any thoughts?
Ed

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 11:33 am 
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M. grahamii can have more than one central spine, but very often you only notice the big hooked one even if there are others.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 6:14 pm 
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Ian,
That is so true BUT-----of the few I have looked at :lol: the plants with multiple centrals are first, not common and second, only on a few selected areoles of the plant.
I would love to see a picture from any reader that has a M. grahamii(either species :evil: ) with a large assortment of multiple centrals. It might occur in the kazillion areas I have not had the privledge of viewing. If anyone has an image please share it with us.

Thanks Ian,
AZED

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ArizonaEd--Tucson Cactus and Succulent Society-- www.tucsoncactus.org


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